New levels of Collaboration

My friend and colleague, Lisa Spiro, recently posted on her blog about collaboration in the Digital Humanities http://digitalscholarship.wordpress.com/ . Today scientist Doug Natelson has a blog  post about a collaboration that 1)began at a conference 2)was physical (the student came to the lab for four months.) So this has me thinking. Digital Humanities seems to be picking up speed. More and more researchers seem to be collaborating online for articles. The type of physical collaboration that Doug is talking about seems to be much more rare. It is difficult for many reasons for a scientist, even a student, to leave their home lab, and come to another research institution. But, also, there seems to be so much to gain. Doug's collaborative paper points to this. I currently am collaborating with Michael Fosmire at Purdue for a conference session  and poster for the Special Libraries Association conference this summer. We have had two Skype videocalls, and we email. Today, I'm putting some touches on a shared poster and we will edit the file together online. There would, I think, be alot to be gained by being able to collaborate in person, for a set amount of time. Digital collaboration as a concept really seems to be gaining in speed in the Humanities; of course, for physicists, this has been the norm for a very long time. To see a physicist talking about what is to be gained by physical collaboration interests me. I'm not sure if virtual or physical, or some hybrid is the new model. And perhaps, it is indeed different in the sciences and humanities.

Advertisements

About effervescentlibrarian

UX Librarian at Rice University, Houston, Texas.
This entry was posted in digitalscholarship. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s